ANCESTRAL LINES AND INTERMARRIAGES in The Omnibus Ancestry, 3rd Edition

ANCESTRAL LINES AND INTERMARRIAGES in The Omnibus Ancestry: 619 Documented American and European Lines. This is the 3rd edition of The Omnibus Ancestry — and likely to be the last for some time, as I have moved on to another writing project.

This book may be previewed at Lulu (http://www.lulu.com/shop/david-boles/the-omnibus-ancestry-619-documented-american-and-european-lines/ebook/product-23158054.html).

THE OMNIBUS ANCESTRY.3rd.Lulu.cover.c

Only the surnames of DIRECT ancestors are shown, with DIRECTLY ANCESTRAL intermarriages in alphabetical order inside parentheses. For instance, the “Bowers Line (Albert, Boles, Jost, Lindeman, Reimbach, Russell, Speece, Yerian)” entry reflects the marriage of Esther L. Bowers with Harold W. Boles, with the other marriages taking place in earlier generations. All of those are family surnames, and are in Esther’s direct ancestral line.

Keep in mind that these families themselves may have had intermarriages. For instance, looking up the Yerian name produces the entry “Yerian/Jurian/Irion Line (Bollin, Bowers, Conradi, Dorn, Fosselman, Haug, Knopf, Pfister)”. In turn each of these may have had intermarriages, and so on. The Omnibus Ancestry covers a web of interconnected families.

However note that in some instances, especially in historical Welsh families, surnames were not used. In those instances the intermarriages are more reflective of personal names than family names. For example, the “Owen Line (Rhys)” entry reflects the marriage of Wenllian ferch Owen, with William ap Rhys (i.e., Wenllian daughter of Owen, with William son of Rhys).

Entries in red reflect additions to the intermarriages index since the one for the 2nd edition.

Abercrombie Line (Rattray)

Abercromby Line (Maule)

Abernethy Line (Borthwick, Ogilvy, Stewart)

Abraham Line (Martin)

Ackerly Line (Oliver)

Addams Line (op den Graeff, Rossiter)

Almot Line (Clenche, Naunton)

Altrate (Altruth, Alteried, Alterriedt) Line (Dick, Ecklin, Schantzenbach)

Amyas Line (Clenche)

Andreas Line (Larsdotter, Nilsson)

Andrews Line (Button)

Arbogast (Lindemann)

Arrants / Arnst Line (Phillips, Price, Smith)

Ashton Line (Byron, Trafford)

Assiter Line (Payne)

Atwood Line (Coons, Fishback)

Auliffe Line (Tomey)

Austin Line (Fleming)

Babb Line (Davis, Hussey, Lewis)

Bachiler / Bachelor Line (Bate, Wing)

Baer / Bare Line (Mylin, Stayman, Witmer)

Bailey Line (McIntire)

Ballow Line (Birkell, Goode, Park/Parker, Read, Ripley)

Banister Line (Chappell)

Barber (James) Line (Readshaw, Stainburne, Stake, Tidmarsh, Wright)

Barber (William) Line (Burnet, Parker)

Barnes Line (Gullett)

Barrier / Berger Line (Kunz, Massey, Reynolds)

Barth / Bard / Bart Line (Boles, Ebert, Hickey, Jost, Malmberg, Nerbel, Rung)

Bartram Line (Cartlidge)

Basset (Thomas of Miscin) Line (Evan, Evans, Fleming, Griffith, Marcross, Morgan, Thomas)

Basset (Thomas of Saint Hilari) Line (Caerdydd, Llywelyn)

Bateman Line (Ellis)

Bauer (Neubecker)

Beaton / Bethune (David) Line (Boswell, Duddingston, Hamilton, Stewart, Stirling)

Beaton / Bethune (John) Line (Boswell, Graham, Monypenny)

Beauchamp Line (St. John, Stourton)

Beaufort Line (Holand, Roet, Stewart)

Beaumont Line (Botreaux, Everingham, Vere)

Becker Line (Messerschmitz, Seegmueller)

Becx Line (Neeff, Diepenbroucks)

Beer Line (Stuell)

Belson Line (Jordan)

Bergen Line (Lubbertsen, Rapelje, Sleght)

Beringer Line (Müller)

Bidel Line (Bruckenfelder, Wagner)

Binford Line (Chappell, Ellyson, Mosby)

Blaugdone / Blackden Line (Brock, Watts)

Bleijck Line (Jans, Nevius)

Bodine Line (Brown, Crocheron, Finch, Sebring)

Boles / Bole Line (Barth, Bowers, Dickison, Foster, Linton, Massey, Painter)

Bollin Line (Irion)

Borthwick Line (Abernethy, Hay)

Bos Line (Leenderts, Maartens, Slecht)

Boswell Line (Bethune, Melville)

Boteler Line (Gerard, Plumpton)

Botreaux Line (Daubeny, Hungerford, Beaumont, St. Lo)

Bourgogne Line (Dampierre, Holland, Kleve)

Bowers / Bauer Line (Albert, Boles, Jost, Lindeman, Reimbach, Russell, Snyder, Speece, Yerian)

Bowman Line (Martin, Robinson)

Boyd Line (Gifford, Gordon, Maxwell, Montgomerie)

Bradshagh Line (St. John)

Brasseur Line (Ellis)

Brereton Line (Savage, Venables)

Brock Line (Blaugdone)

Bromflete Line (Clifford, FitzHugh, Saint John)

Brown (James) Line (Bodine, Drury, Langham, Reynolds, Russell)

Brown (Richard) Line (Davis/Davies, McQueen, Russell, Stevenson, Taylor)

Brown (Thomas) Line (Large, McIntire)

Brownlee Line (McClain, Walcott, Wilson)

Brusyard Line (Naunton)

Buchanan Line (Gray)

Burckhart Line (Hahlman)

Burnett Line (Barber, Gullett, Roberts)

Busch Line (Busch, Scholt)

Buster Line (Foster, Woods)

Button Line (Andrews, Hallyn, Hywel, Ieuan, John)

Cadwalader Line (Ellis, Hugh)

Calder Line (Campbell, Rose, Sutherland)

Campbell (Archibald of Argyll) Line (Campbell, Gordon, Hamilton, Macintosh, Somerville, Stewart, Stuart)

Campbell (Archibald of Auchinbreck) Line (Campbell, Lamont, Scrymgeour, Stewart)

Campbell (Archibald of Cawdor) Line (Calder, Campbell, Grant, Stuart)

Campbell (Duncan) Line (Moncreiffe, Murray, Stewart)

Carnegie Line (Guthrie, Kinnaird, Lindsay, Scrymgeour, Strachan, Vaus)

Cartlidge Line (Bartram, Need, Swan, Swifte, Wright)

Cary Line (Goodale, Hobson, Milner, Pleasants, Taylor)

Chandler Line (Benger, Downham, Jefferis, Smith, Spratt)

Chapman Line (Gill, McFadden)

Chappell Line (Banister, Binford)

Cheyne Line (Rose)

Chichele Line (Barret, Kene, Knolles)

Chicheley Line (Dennis, Gronwy, Maelog)

Chisholm Line (Bisset, Halyburton, Sutherland)

Christ Line (Segmüller)

Clark Line (McCrosky)

Clench / Clenche Line (Almot, Amyas, Dameron)

Clifford Line (Beauchamp, Bromflete, Dacre, Melford, Percy, Ros, Saint John)

Coles Line (Hawxhurst, Townsend)

Colfer Line (Power, Sinnott)

Collet Line (May, Stile, Withers)

Colville Line (Arcy, Wandesford)

Conklin / Conklyn / Conklyn / Concklyne Line (Allseabrook, Robinson, Tarbell, Williams, Youngs)

Conradi Line (Irion, Teichmann)

Cool Line (Van Kouwenhoven)

Coons / Kuntze Line (Atwood, Foster, Hanback, Schuster, Steiger)

Cowdray Line (Rythe)

Cradoc Line (Gwyn, Perrot)

Cranstoun Line (Ruthven)

Crew Line (Ellyson, Gattley)

Crichton Line (Seton)

Crocheron Line (Bodine)

Cunningham Line (Robinson, Tomey)

Dacre Line (Clifford, Neville)

Dafydd (ap Hywel) Line (Hywel, Rhys)

Dafydd (ap Rees) Line (Havard, John, Madog)

Dameron Line (Clench, Gosnold, Smith, Thomas)

David (ap Hopkin) Line (Howel)

David (ap Llewelyn) Line (Gamage)

David (ap Morgan) Line (Gwyn, Morgan, Philip, William)

David (ap Walhin) Line (Price)

David (John) Line (Lewis)

Davis (Nathaniel) Line (Babb, Lewis, Martin, Withers)

Davis (William) Line (Hobson)

Dennis Line (Bere, Gamage, Vaughan)

Denniston Line (Maxwell)

Dick Line (Altrate, McIntire, Neubecker)

Dickison / Dickason / Dickinson Line (Boles, Fowler, Howland, Townsend)

Dietz Line (Stammler)

Domville Line (Hulse)

Dorn Line (Schaeffer, Yerian)

Douglas (Archibald) Line (Graham, Moray, Stewart)

Douglas (George) Line (Graham, Hay, Sibbald, Stewart)

Douglas (Henry) Line (Lindsay, Lovell)

Douglas (James) Line (Halyburton)

Douglas (William of Drumlanrig) Line (Innes, Maxwell, Murray)

Douglas (William of Nithsdale) Line (Sinclair, Stewart)

Downing Line (Ellis, Slack)

Drake Line (Dungan, Oliver)

Dresler Line (Friesenhagen)

Drummond Line (Campbell, Graham, Lindsay, Murray, Ruthven, Sinclair)

Drury Line (Brown, Hayden, Payne)

Duddingston Line (Beaton)

Dunbar Line (Lindsay, Seton)

Dundas Line (Douglas, Moncreiffe, Stewart)

Dungan (Jeremiah) Line (Drake, Hellings, Latham, Smith, Weaver)

Dungan (William) Line (Large, Weaver, Wing)

Durnbläser Line (Wolfer)

Ecklin Line (Alterriedt)

Edmonstone Line (Graham, Shaw, Stewart)

Eger / Ege Line (Friesenhagen)

Ellis (Ellis) Line (Bateman, Cadwalader, Downing, Morgan)

Ellis (Jesse) Line (Brasseur, Foster, Holman, Slack, Veatch)

Ellyson Line (Binford, Crew, Gerard, Hamilton, Jordan, Spence)

Emerson Line (Brewster, Crabbe, Wolcott)

Erb Line (Painter)

Ermentraudt / Armentrout Line (Friedli, Hain, Russell)

Erskine Line (Douglas, Keith, Lindsay)

Evan (ap Evan) Line (Basset, Thomas)

Evan (ap Griffith) Line (David, Griffith)

Evan (ap Llewelyn) Line (Vaughan)

Evan (ap Madoc) Line (David)

Evan (Gitto) Line (Richard)

Evans Line (Basset, Evan, Morgan, Price, Rees, Thomas, Vaughan)

Evered Line (Pleasants, Sellars)

Everingham Line (Beaumont)

Faris Line (McCrosky)

Fearon Line (Robinson)

Ferris Line (Woodson)

Finch Line (Bodine)

Fischbach Line (Heimbach, Lueck)

Fischer Line (Probst)

Fishback Line (Atwood, Hager, Heimbach, Holtzclaw)

FitzHugh Line (Bromflete, Grey, Lescrope)

Fleming (Christopher) Line (Austin, Herbert, Mansel, Meyrick, Thomas)

Flender (Henchen) Line (Busch, Holtzclau, Latsch)

Flender (Henrich) Line (Busch, Holtzklau)

Forbes Line (Douglas, Grant, Keith, Kennedy, Seton, Stewart)

Ford Line (Shercliffe)

Fosselman Line (Probst, Schäffer, Yerian)

Foster Line (Boles, Buster, Coons, Ellis, Parish, Smith)

Foulshurst Line (Gerard, Mainwaring, Vernon)

Fowler Line (Dickinson, Hoyt, Newell)

Friedli Line (Ermentraudt, Saltzgeber)

Friesenhagen Line (Dresler, Eger, Hager)

Gainsford Line (Sidney, White)

Gaisenhofer Line (Goeller)

Gam Line (Gwilim, Ieuan, Vaughan)

Gamage Line (David, Dennis, Evan, Hugh, Rodburgh)

Gattley Line (Crew)

Gerard Line (Boteler, Foulshurst, Slye, Snowe, Stanley, Strangeways, Trafford)

Gill Line (Chapman, Marcey)

Glen Line (Erskine, Ogilvy)

Glencarnie Line (Grant)

Gobels Line (Pletges)

Goeller Line (Gaisenhofer, Greiner, Wagner)

Goode Line (Ballow, Bennett)

Gordon (Adam) Line (Keith, Seton)

Gordon / Seton (Alexander of Huntly) Line (Campbell, Crichton, Fleming, Gordon, Stewart)

Gordon (Alexander of Lochinvar) Line (Boyd, Kennedy, Mackintosh)

Gosnold Line (Dameron, Kebell)

Goushill Line (FitzAlan, Stanley)

Graham (David) Line (Beaton, Douglas, Graham, Halyburton, Lovell, Mackintosh, Ogilvy, Scott)

Graham (Patrick) Line (Douglas, Stewart)

Graham (William) Line (Douglas, Drummond, Erskine, Keith, Murray)

Grant Line (Forbes, Glencarnie, Mackintosh, Murray, Ogilvy, Stewart)

Graver Line (Readshawe)

Gray Line (Forbes, Mortimer, Rollo, Wemyss)

Greiner (Jacob) Line (Goeller, Raquet, Schaff, Scheid)

Greiner (Nicolaus) Line (Golar)

Grey Line (FitzHugh, St. Quintin)

Griffith Line (Gruffudd, Jenkin, Mansel)

Grim Line (Schantzenbach)

Groh Line (Roth, Wagner)

Gruffudd Line (Einion, Rhys)

Guelders Line (Kleve, Leiningen, Stewart, von Arkel)

Gullett Line (Barnes, Burnett, Housh, McClain, Mills, Robinson, Trice)

Guthrie Line (Maule)

Gwilim Line (Mansel, Richard)

Gwilym (ap Jenkin) Line (Gwilym, Llywelyn, Thomas)

Gwilym (ap Philip) Line (Davydd, Llywelyn)

Hager Line (Fishback, Friesenhagen)

Hallyn Line (Button, John, Morgan)

Halyburton (James) Line (Graham, Maule, Scrymgeour)

Halyburton (Patrick) Line (Douglas, Ruthven, Seton)

Hamilton Line (Beaton, Campbell, Douglas, Livingston, Stewart)

Hanback Line (Coons, Jung, Schneider)

Hanscombe Line (Ensam, Samm)

Harbour Line (Packwood, Snyder, Thomas)

Harpway Line (Havard, Howell, Ieuan)

Harrington Line (Loring, Stanley)

Haug Line (Yerian)

Havard (Jenkin) Line (Dafydd, Thomas, Vaughan, Watkin)

Havard (William) Line (Hywel)

Hawxhurst Line (Cole)

Hay (Thomas) Line (Hay, Stewart)

Hay (William) Line (Douglas, Hay)

Hayden Line (Butler, Drury)

Heimbach (Johannes) Line (Fischbach)

Heimbach (Philipp) Line (Fischbach, Otterbach)

Heisdorfer Line (Rung, Weber)

Hellings Line (Dungan, Parsons)

Hendrickse Line (Lubbertsen, Martense)

Henry Line (Boger, Schedler, Spies)

Hepburn Line (Borthwick, Home, Sinclair, Vaux, Wallace)

Herbert Line (Fleming, Morely)

Herr Line (Loetscher, Mylin)

Herries Line (Douglas, Lindsay, Maxwell)

Hickey Line (Barth, Robinson, Russell, Sinnott)

Hieronymus Line (Rimpler)

Hobson Line (Cary, Davis)

Hochstrasser Line (Meili)

Hoffman Line (Probst, Rimpler)

Holbrook Line (Weaver)

Holland (Albrecht) Line (Bourgogne, Brieg)

Holland (Edmund) Line (FitzAlan, Plantagenet, Touchet)

Hollingsworth Line (Atkinson, Ree, Withers)

Holman / Hahlman / Heilmann Line (Burckhart, Ellis, Rudolph)

Holtzclaw Line (Fishback, Flender, Otterbach)

Home Line (Hay, Hepburn, Lauder, Pepdie)

Houghton Line (Stanley)

Hoult Line (Jolliffe, Shircliffe)

Housh Line (Gullett)

Howel (ab Evan) Line (Gibbon)

Howel (ap David) Line (Eva, Hywel, Llywelyn, Richard)

Howland Line (Dickinson, Tilley)

Hoyt Line (Fowler)

Hulse Line (Bruen, Domville, Vernon)

Hungerford Line (Botreaux, Hussey, Peverell, White)

Hurst Line (Marshe, Tilley)

Hussey Line (Babb, Bachiler, Perkins, Wood)

Hyde Line (Lidiard, Lovingcotte, Yate)

Hywel Line (David, Ieuan, Morgan)

Ieuan (ap Gruffudd) Line (Button, Gawdyn)

Ieuan (ap Gwilym) Line (Rhys)

Ieuan (ap Jenkin) Line (Harpway)

Innes Line (Douglas, Fraser, Ogilvy)

Jacobsdochter Line (Jacobsdr, Van Kouwenhoven)

Jefferis Line (Chandler, Nowell, Roberts)

John (ab Ieuan) Line (Button, Gwilym, Thomas)

John (ap Jeffrey) Line (Dafydd, Havard, Owain, Rees)

John (ap Morgan) Line (Kemeys, Thomas)

Jenkin Line (Gruffudd, Llewelyn, Nicholas)

Jolliffe Line (Hoult, Sheppard, Slack, Springer)

Jordan (Robert) Line (Belson, Brasseur, Pleasants)

Jordan (Thomas) Line (Brasseur, Ellyson, Pleasants, Robinson, Thomas)

Jost (Christoph) Line (Bowers)

Jost (Conrad) Line (Bardt, Barth, Engel, Stammler, Wassermann)

Jung Line (Heimbach)

Kammer Line (Enderli, Loetscher, Witwer)

Keith (Alexander) Line (Ogilvy, Stewart)

Keith (William) Line (Erskine, Gordon, Graham, Troup)

Keller Line (Schatto, Stake)

Kemeys Line (David, Morgan)

Kennedy Line (Gordon, Maxwell, Seton, Stewart)

Kleve Line (Bourgogne, Guelders, Julich)

Knoertzer Line (Weigenthall)

Knolles Line (Chichele)

Knopf Line (Effinger, Irion)

Kunz Line (Berger)

Kyne Line (Chichele, Mansel, Pollidore)

Lamont Line (Campbell, MacDonald)

Lang Line (Schaf, Segmüller)

Large Line (Brown, Dungan)

Latham Line (Dungan)

Latsch Line (vor der Hardt)

Lauder Line (Fallow, Home, Landell)

Lawes Line (Munford, Wallbye)

Lazear Line (Linton, Plummer, Ryan, Webb)

Lennox Line (Campbell, Stuart)

Leslie Line (Halyburton, Hay, Seton, Sinclair)

Lewis (Evan of Cardigan) Line (Davies, Harries)

Lewis (Evan of Chester) Line (Babb, David, Prichard)

Lidiard Line (Hyde)

Lieveling Line (Slecht)

Lindeman Line (Arbogast, Bauer, Springer)

Lindsay (Alexander) Line (Campbell, Dunbar, Ogilvy, Stewart)

Lindsay (James) Line (Herries, Keith)

Linton Line (Boles, Lazear, McFadden, Richards)

Livingston Line (Dundas, Hamilton, Menteith)

Livingstone Line (Moncreiffe, Wemyss)

Llewelyn Line (Llewelyn)

Llywelyn (ap Gwilym) Line (Jenkin, Rhys)

Llywelyn (ap Morgan) Line (Dafydd, Llywelyn)

Llywelyn (ap Phillip) Line (Basset, Howel, Ieuan)

Loetscher Line (Herr, Kammer)

Lovell Line (Douglas, Graham)

Lovingcotte Line (Hyde)

Lubbertsen Line (Bergen, Hendrickse)

Lueck Line (Fischbach)

MacDonald (Allan) Line (Macintosh, Stewart)

MacDonald (Donald) Line (Leslie, Sutherland)

MacDonald (John) Line (Bisset, Lamont, O’Neil, O’Neill)

Mackenzie Line (Fraser, Grant, MacAulay, MacDougall, MacLeod, Macintosh, Stewart)

Mackintosh / Macintosh Line (Campbell, Gordon, Graham, Grant, MacDonald, Mackenzie, McQueen, Ogilvy)

MacLeod Line (Mackenzie, Mar)

Madog Line (Gruffudd)

Maelog Line (Chicheley, Daubeny)

Mainwaring Line (Foulshurst, Venables)

Malmberg Line (Andersdotter, Barth, Swanson)

Mansel Line (Fleming, Griffith, Gwilim, Kyne, Penrice, Turberville)

Marcey Line (Canes, Gill)

Marcross Line (Basset)

Marshe Line (Hurst)

Martin (James) Line (Bowman, McMurtrie, McMyrtre, Roberts, Smith, Trotter)

Martin (Llewellyn) Line (Abraham, Bowen, Davies, Morgan)

Martin (Richard) Line (Tichborne)

Martin (Thomas) Line (Roberts, Tucker)

Martz Line (Burkhart, Nave, Snider)

Massey Line (Barrier, Boles, Modrell)

Maule Line (Abercromby, Fleming, Gray, Guthrie, Halyburton, Lindsay, Mercer, Rollo)

Maxwell (Herbert) Line (Herries, Kennedy, Stewart)

Maxwell (Robert) Line (Boyd, Denniston, Lindsay)

May Line (Collet)

McClain Line (Brownlee, Gullett)

McCrosky / McCoskery Line (Clark, Faris, Stayman)

McFadden Line (Chapman, Heston, Linton)

McIntire Line (Bailey, Brown, Dick, Speece)

McMurtrie Line (Martin)

McMyrtre Line (Martin)

McQueen / Macqueen Line (Brown, Mackintosh)

Melford Line (Clifford, Need)

Melville Line (Boswell, Scott, Stewart)

Mercer Line (Barclay, Drummond, Maule, Stewart, Wardlaw)

Messerschmidt Line (Messerschmitz)

Messerschmitz Line (Becker, Messerschmidt)

Meyrick Line (Fleming, Harpway, Ieuan, Meurig, Richard, William)

Michell Line (Sidney)

Milner Line (Cary)

Minnes Line (Feddans, Van Voorhees)

Modrell Line (Massey)

Moncreiffe line (Campbell, Dundas, Livingstone, Murray)

Montgomerie Line (Boyd, MacDonald, Stuart)

Monypenny Line (Bethune, Wemyss)

Morgan (ap David) Line (Evan)

Morgan (ap David Powell) Line (David, Jenkin)

Morgan (ap Hugyn) Line (Marchudd)

Morgan (ap Jenkin) Line (Basset, Vaughan, Welsh, William)

Morgan (ap John) Line (David, Evan, William)

Morgan (ap Trahaearn) Line (Ieuan)

Mortimer (Edmund) Line (Percy, Plantagenet)

Mosby Line (Binford, Gostlyne, Woodson)

Müller Line (Beringer, Scherb, Schweitzer)

Munford Line (Lawes, Pleasants, Youngs)

Murray Line (Campbell, Colquhoun, Drummond, Graham, Grant, Gray, Keith, Stewart)

Mylin / Meilin / Meili Line (Baer, Bär, Herr, Hochstrasser)

Nash Line (Sloper, Withers)

Naunton Line (Almot, Barney, Brusyard, Doyley, Tymperley)

Nave Line (Martz)

Need Line (Cartlidge, Melford)

Nerbel Line (Barth, Flekkenstein)

Neubecker Line (Bauer, Dick)

Neville Line (Dacre, Percy, Stafford)

Nevyus / Nevius / Neeff Line (Becx, Bleijck, Schenck, Sleght, Van Voorhees)

Newell Line (Fowler)

Nohr Line (Peiffer, Raquet)

Nowell Line (Jefferis, Tatchell

Oberholtzer Line (Steman)

Ogilvy (Alexander of Findlater) Line (Abernethy, Glen, Gordon, Innes, Macintosh, Ramsay, Sinclair)

Ogilvy (David) Line (Glen, Ramsay, Rattray)

Ogilvy (James) Line (Durward, Graham, Kennedy, Lindsay, Sinclair)

Ogilvy (Patrick) Line (Keith, Oliphant)

Oldcastle Line (Pembridge, Whitney)

Oliphant Line (Ogilvy, Stewart, Wardlaw)

Oliver Line (Ackerly, Drake)

op den Graeff Line (Addams, Jansen, Peters, Pletges)

Otterbach Line (Heimbach, Holtzclaw, Stuell)

Owain (ap Gruffudd) Line (Hanmer, Scudamore)

Owain (ap Marchudd) Line (Jeffrey, Llywelyn, Morgan, Rhys)

Owen Line (Rhys)

Packwood Line (Harbour, Hough)

Painter / Bender Line (Boles, Bullinger, Erb)

Parish Line (Foster)

Parker Line (Barber)

Parsons Line (Hellings, Tarr)

Payne Line (Assiter, Drury)

Percy Line (Clifford, Mortimer, Neville)

Perkins Line (Hussey)

Peverell Line (Courtenay, Hungerford)

Pfister Line (Irion)

Phillips Line (Arrants)

Plantagenet Line (Castile, Holand)

Pleasants Line (Cary, Evered, Jordan, Larcombe, Marshall, Munford, Putrasse)

Pletges Line (Gobels, op den Graeff)

Plummer Line (Lazear, Smith, Wilson, Yate)

Polhemius Line (Sebring, Van der Werven)

Powell Line (Richard, Woolaston)

Price (John) Line (David, Evan, Jevan)

Price (Thomas) Line (Arrants, Lee)

Prichard Line (Basset, Evan, Fleming, Gamage, Howel, Lewis, Llewelyn, Meyrick)

Prickett Line (Springer)

Pride Line (Hallcott, Roberts)

Princehouse / Printzhausen Line (Speece)

Probst Line (Fischer, Fosselman, Hoffman)

Rapelje Line (Baudoin, Bergen, Trico)

Raquet Line (Didenhoff, Greiner, Nohr)

Rattray Line (Abercrombie, Kennedy, Ogilvy, Stewart)

Readshaw Line (Barber, Graver)

Ree Line (Hollingsworth)

Reimbach Line (Bauer)

Rhys (ap Hywel) Line (Hywel, Richard)

Rhys (ap Robert) Line (Hywel, Llywelyn)

Richard Line (Einon)

Ries Line (Crafft, Wassermann)

Rimpler Line (Hieronymus, Hoffman)

Ripley Line (Ballow, Thomas)

Roberts (John) Line (Jefferis, Withers)

Roberts (Morris) Line (Burnett, Martin, Pride, Step)

Roberts (Thomas) Line (Martin)

Robinson (John) Line (Fearon, Jordan)

Robinson (Melvin) Line (Bowman, Gullett, Hickey)

Robinson (Rossiter) Line (Conklin, Cunningham, Rossiter, Speece, Withers)

Rodburgh Line (Gamage)

Rollo / Rollock Line (Gray, Maule)

Ros Line (Clifford, Stafford)

Rose Line (Calder, Cheyne, Macintosh, Sutherland)

Rossiter Line (Addams, Robinson)

Roth Line (Groh)

Rudolph Line (Heilman, Ströhlin)

Rung Line (Barth, Greiner, Heisdorfer)

Russell (Richard) Line (Brown, Hickey)

Russell (Solomon) Line (Bowers, Brown, Ermentraudt)

Russell (Thomas) Line (Ludlow, Whitney)

Ruthven Line (Buttergask, Cranstoun, Drummond, Halyburton, Levington)

Rythe Line (Cowdray, Tichborne)

Saint John (Edward) Line (Aton, Bromflete)

Saint John (John) Line (Beauchamp, Bradshagh, Clifford, Pavley)

Saltzgeber Line (Friedli, Hoffman, Schweitzer)

Samm Line (Clark, Hanscombe, Surtees, Tidmarsh)

Savage Line (Brereton, Daniers, Stanley, Swynnerton, Trafford)

Schaeffer Line (Dorn)

Schaff Line (Christmann, Greiner, Lang)

Schäffer Line (Fosselmann, Vigelius)

Schantzenbach Line (Alterrriedt, Grim, Weber)

Schatto Line (Keller)

Schenck Line (Nevius, Van Kouwenhoven)

Scherb Line (Müller)

Schneider Line (Heimbach)

Scholt Line (Busch)

Schweitzer Line (Müller, Saltzgeber, Wolfer)

Scott Line (Melville)

Scrymgeour Line (Campbell, Carnegie, Cunninghame, Halyburton, Lyon, Maxwell, Ogilvy, Oliphant)

Scudamore Line (Ewias, Owain, Weston)

Sebring / Seuberinge Line (Bodine, Polhemius)

Segmüller / Seegmueller Line (Becker, Christ, Lang)

Sel Line (auf dem Berge, Busch)

Seton Line (Fleming, Sinclair, Stuart)

Shaw Line (Edmonstone)

Sheppard Line (Jolliffe, Watts)

Shircliffe / Shircliff / Shercliffe / Sheircliffe Line (Ford, Hoult, Spinke, Thompson, Wheeler)

Sibbald Line (Douglas)

Sidney Line (Gainsford, Michell)

Sinclair (Henry) Line (Douglas, Halyburton, Hepburn, Leslie, Ogilvy)

Sinclair (John) Line (Ogilvy)

Sinclair (William of Hermantoun) Line (Seton)

Sinnott Line (Colfer, Hickey, Nevill)

Slack / Sleght / Slecht Line (Barentsdr, Bergen, Bos, Downing, Ellis, Jolliffe, Lieveling, Nevyus)

Sloper (Thomas) Line (Bailly, Withers)

Sloper (William) Line (Nash)

Slye Line (Gerard, Wheeler)

Smith (Jeremiah) Line (Arrants, Dungan, Foster)

Smith (John) Line (Chandler, Webb)

Smith (Richard) Line (Dameron)

Smith (William) Line (Withers)

Snowe Line (Gerard)

Snyder / Snider / Schneider Line (Bowers, Harbour, Martz, Wagner)

Speece / Spies Line (Bowers, Henry, McIntire, Princehouse, Robinson, Stayman)

Springer (Christian) Line (Lindeman, Melchoir)

Springer (Dennis) Line (Hudson, Jolliffe, Prickett)

Stafford Line (Beauchamp, Neville)

Stainburne Line (Barber, Wyly)

Stake / Steeg / Steg Line (Barber, Degen, Haeppert, Keller, Stayman)

Stammler Line (Dietz, Jost)

Stanley (Thomas) Line (Goushill, Harrington, Lathom, Savage)

Stanley (William) Line (Arderne, Bromley, Gerard, Houghton, Savage)

Stayman / Steman Line (Baer, McCrosky, Oberholtzer, Speece, Stake)

Steiger Line (Kuntze)

Step Line (Roberts)

Stephens Line (Yate)

Stevenson Line (Brown)

Stewart (David) Line (Graham, Lindsay)

Stewart (James) Line (Rattray)

Stewart (John of Atholl) Line (Beaufort, Campbell, Grant, MacDougal, Rattray, Sinclair)

Stewart (John of Blackhall) Line (Campbell)

Stewart (John of Lorn) Line (Campbell, MacDougall, Stewart)

Stewart (King James) Line (Beaufort, Drummond, Guelders, Hamilton)

Stewart (Robert of Albany) Line (Graham, Stewart)

Stewart (Robert of Durisdeer) Line (MacDougall, Mercer)

Stewart (Walter) Line (Campbell, Edmonstone, Graham, Lennox)

St. Lo Line (Clyvedon, Botreaux)

Strangeways Line (Gerard, Orells)

Ströhlin Line (Rudolph)

Stourton Line (Beauchamp)

Stuart Line (Campbell, Lennox, Montgomerie, Seton)

Stuell Line (Beer, Otterbach)

Surtees Line (Martin, Samm, Whittamore)

Sutherland (Alexander) Line (Calder, MacDonald)

Sutherland (William) Line (Cheyne, Chisholm, Mureff / Murray, Rose)

Swanson Line (Andreasdotter, Malmberg)

Swift Line (Wing)

Swynnerton Line (Beke, Savage)

Tarbell Line (Conklin)

Tarrant Line (Sloper, Withers)

Taylor (John) Line (Brown)

Taylor (Robert) Line (Wood)

Taylor (Thomas) Line (Cary)

Teichmann Line (Conradi)

Thomas (ap Evan) Line (Cradoc, Fleming, Thomas, William)

Thomas (ap Gronwy) Line (Chicheley, Hywel, Ieuan)

Thomas (ap Gruffudd) Line (Dafydd, Havard, Roger)

Thomas (ap Gwilim) Line (Evan)

Thomas (ap Gwilim David) Line (Lleisan)

Thomas (ap Hywel) Line (Gwilym, Ieuan, Havard, Weston)

Thomas (ap Llywelyn) Line (Ieuan, Llywelyn)

Thomas (ap Morgan) Line (Basset, Halyn, Jevan, John, Kemeys)

Thomas (Charles) Line (Dameron, Harbour, Jordan, Ripley)

Thompson Line (Sheircliffe)

Tichborne Line (Martin, Rythe, Wandesford, White, Yate)

Tidmarsh Line (Barber, Hiorn, Samm)

Thurlow Line (Woolcott)

Tilley Line (Howland, Hurst)

Tomey Line (Auliffe, Cunningham)

Touchet / Tuchet Line (Holland, Mortimer, Whitney)

Townsend Line (Coles, Dickinson)

Trafford Line (Ashton, Gerard, Savage, Venables)

Trice Line (Eley, Gullett)

Trico Line (Rapelje, Sauvagie)

Trotter Line (Gibbs, Martin)

Turberville Line (Mansel)

Valoniis Line (Wardlaw)

Van Fisphe Line (vor der Hardt)

Van Kouwenhoven Line (Cool, Jacobsdochter, Schenck)

Van Voorhees Line (Minnes, Nevyus, Seuberinge)

Vaughan (Hopkin) Line (Dennis)

Vaughan (Roger) Line (Devereux, Gam, Jenkin)

Vaughan (Thomas) Line (Vaughan)

Vaughan (William) Line (Evan, Evans, Gam, Havard, Vaughan, Whitney)

Veatch Line (Ellis, Gakerlin)

Venables (Hugh) Line (Cotton, Mainwaring)

Venables (William) Line (Massy, Trafford)

Vernon Line (Foulshurst, Hulse)

Vigelius Line (Schäffer)

Von Arkel Line (Egmond, Jülich)

Vor der Hardt (Hen) Line (Sel, van Fisphe, vor der Hardt)

Vor der Hardt (Henchen) Line (vor der Hardt)

Wagner Line (Bidel, Goeller, Groh)

Walcott / Wolcott / Woolcott Line (Brownlee, Dawe, Emerson, Phippen, Thurlow)

Wandesford Line (Colville, Musters, Tichborne)

Wardlaw Line (Lauder, Mercer, Oliphant, Valoniis)

Warren Line (Youngs)

Wassermann Line (Jost, Ries)

Watts Line (Blaugdone, Sheppard)

Weaver Line (Dungan, Holbrook)

Weber Line (Schantzenbach, Weigenthall)

Weigenthall Line (Knoertzer, Weber)

Wells Line (Yate)

Welsh Line (Philip)

Wemyss Line (Erskine, Livingstone)

Weston Line (Hywel, Scudamore)

Wheeler Line (Shircliffe, Slye)

White Line (Gainsford, Hungerford, Tichborne)

Whitney Line (Cromwell, Oldcastle, Russell, Touchet, Vaughan)

Whittamore Line (Messenger, Surtees)

William (ap John) Line (Howel)

William (ap Rhys) Line (Hopkin, Jevan, Owen)

William (ap Thomas) Line (Richard)

Wilson (Edward) Line (Plummer)

Wilson (Robert?) Line (Brownlee)

Wing Line (Bachiler, Dungan, Swift)

Withers Line (Collet, Davis, Holllingsworth, Nash, Roberts, Robinson, Sloper, Smith, Tarrant, Wollaston)

Witmer Line (Baer, Eby, Engle)

Wolfer Line (Durnbläser, Schweitzer)

Wood Line (Hussey, Taylor)

Woodson Line (Ferris, Mosby)

Woolaston Line (Powell, Withers)

Wright Line (Barber, Cartlidge)

Yate Line (Ashenden, Hyde, Plummer, Stephens, Tichborne, Wells)

Yerian / Jurian / Irion Line (Bollin, Bowers, Conradi, Dorn, Fosselman, Haug, Knopf, Pfister)

Youngs (Joseph) Line (Conklin, Warren)

Youngs (William) Line (Munford, Muns)

JUST RELEASED! The Omnibus Ancestry, 3rd Edition

Or if you prefer formal titles, The Omnibus Ancestry: 619 Documented American and European Lines.  This newly revised edition extends many ancestral lines, drops a small handful, and adds over 30 new ones since the 2nd edition. As indicated by the title, a total of 619 are now covered, with many carried back to about the year 1350. This is the most up-to-date and definitive ancestry of the Boles-Bowers and Barth-Hickey families across their many limbs and branches.

THE OMNIBUS ANCESTRY.3rd.Lulu.cover.c

The book updates numerous previous publications in handy, condensed, corrected, and referenced form.  Besides the previous editions of The Omnibus Ancestry, the 10 books it updates include:

  • Barth-Hickey Ancestry
  • Bowers-Russell Ancestry
  • Ellis Ancestors: Some Immigrants, Colonists, and Pioneers
  • Foster Ancestors: Some Europeans, Immigrants, Colonists, and Pioneers
  • Snyder-Harbour Ancestry
  • Some Earlier Americans: Boles-Linton Ancestors
  • Speece-Robinson Ancestry
  • Stayman-McCrosky Ancestry
  • The Bower-Bowers Descendants of Johann Jacob Bauer
  • Withers-Davis Ancestry

A full list of the ancestral lines appears at the Bolesbooks web site.

Notes are used to elaborate on the text, to explain the logic behind conclusions, to indicate where further generations may be found before 1350, to provide references, and to make suggestions for further research.  However, the notes are listed separately and do not intrude should you prefer a smooth reading of the text.

There’s never been a better time to check out The Omnibus Ancestry!  To access a preview on the Lulu publication page, please click here.

32. Our Cousins The Scientists: John Bartram, William Bartram, and John Dalton

My wife and I are scientists — behavioral scientists, to be sure, but scientists nevertheless. Today such occupations are not unusual, but two or three hundred years ago they were almost unheard of in a world where most people made their living off the land.

I have written before about two protoscientists in our family tree. Thomas Ashton and Edmund Trafford, of co. Lancaster, England, practiced alchemy in the 15th century, claiming to have “discovered an elixir that restored youth and changed base metals into gold and silver”.

Not truly scientists, alchemists nevertheless displayed certain scientific characteristics. These included notions of causation – one idea, for example, was that different metals were alloys that could be transmuted into precious metal by driving out impurities – and the use of experiments to further knowledge. They departed from science in the haphazardness of their efforts, the use of religious metaphor to support their endeavors (e.g., Christ’s torments reflected in the alchemical torment of metals), and the failure to properly cumulate results (which if nothing else should have led to an earlier abandonment of their efforts). As a result in the end they contributed little to the science of chemistry [7, 8].

However, there are three true scientists in our family background who made more substantial contributions than the alchemists. Unlike Thomas Ashton and Edmund Trafford they are not direct ancestors, but rather cousins of varying degree.

John Bartram

John Bartram was born in 1699, the son of William Bartram, a Quaker of Darby township, (now) Delaware county, Pennsylvania, and the grandson of John Bartram, who in 1682 had immigrated to the colony with his family from co. Derby, England.

John educated himself in botany, medicine, and surgery while supporting himself as a farm laborer. In 1728 he created the first American botanical garden in Kingsessing, now part of Philadelphia and still in existence as “Bartram’s Garden”, a national historic landmark [1].

He began actively collecting native American plants and seeds of all types, many of which he forwarded to London naturalist Peter Collinson. For that purpose he began undertaking long-range travel across the eastern half of the American continent. A keen observer, he experimented with plant hybrids in his Kingsessing garden. However, he was not a systematist like Carolus Linnaeus, the creator of the genus and species classifications we know today. Nevertheless Linnaeus called him the greatest “natural botanist” in the world, and in 1765 George III appointed Bartram as Botanist to the King. John died in 1777 [1, 2].

John Bartram
John Bartram (reputed)

Today Bartram is best known for his 1751 book, Observations on the Inhabitants, Soil, Divers Productions, etc., Made by John Bartram in His Travels from Pennsylvania to Onondaga, Oswego, and the Lake Ontario. He is commonly regarded as “the father of American botany” [1].

Through the Bowers and Stayman side of the family, my relatives and I descend from the scientist’s grandfather, the immigrant John Bartram. We are therefore first cousins several times removed from the botanist.

William Bartram

Like his father John, William Bartram (1739-1823) was a noted botanist and writer, as well as an artist, naturalist, ethnographer, and explorer. His Travels Through North & South Carolina, Georgia, East & West Florida, the Cherokee Country, the Extensive Territories of the Muscogulges, or Creek Confederacy, and the Country of the Chactaws (1791) was initially published in Philadelphia, but soon after was reprinted in London, Dublin, Berlin, and Paris, the latter two places in translation [1].

William Bartram
William Bartram

Although he discovered a number of new plants – and resented that he did not receive more recognition for it – William’s fame as a naturalist is based on his great skill as an illustrator of both flora and fauna. This was something that was evident by his teens, and he became progressively more accomplished as he aged. He also continued to maintain the garden at Kingsessing, to which he added new species [3].

Bartram_House_May_2002c
John and William Bartram home and garden

 

In 1808, William sat for a portrait by the famous artist Charles Wilson Peale. A reproduction accompanies. My close relatives and I are William’s second cousins several times removed.

John Dalton

John Dalton was born in 1766 in Eaglesfield, co. Cumberland, England, the son of a Quaker weaver named Joseph Dalton. Joseph’s parents were Jonathan and Abigail (Fearon) Dalton. It was Abigail who provided our ancestral link, for my close relatives and I descend from the Fearon family [4, 5].

At a young age John undertook a course on surveying and navigation, and came to the attention of Eliju Robinson, his relation and a man of means who provided further educational opportunity. He began teaching school in Eaglesfield at the tender age of 12, and studied under John Gough, a blind scholar who taught him the classical languages, mathematics, and natural philosophy [5].

John began his scientific inquiries with a weather diary, using a barometer, thermometer, and hygroscope of his own construction. In 1793, he became a teacher of mathematics, natural philosophy, and chemistry in the New College of Manchester. A year later he read a paper on his own defective color vision to the Literary and Philosophical Society of Manchester, to which he had been elected a short time previously [5].

In 1795, Dalton began the investigations into chemistry and physics that were to lead to his greatest successes. His early work was on the circulation of heat in fluids, and on the relationship between temperature and compression. In the course of studying diffusion, he began to experiment with different elemental gases such as oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen. Studying the absorption of the gases by water, he speculated that absorption was determined by the weight of the gas particles. Although that proved incorrect, it led directly to his successful attempts to assign weights to elements [5].

Developing his ideas over the opening years of the 19th century, Dalton proposed that elements are made of tiny particles called atoms, which differ in size and mass from the atoms of other elements. In addition, elements were proposed to combine in whole-number ratios during chemical reactions to form compounds [4].

Dalton proceeded to publish tables of atomic weights, starting with only five elements, including hydrogen which he assigned a weight of one — a unit now unofficially called a dalton. By 1808, he had included 20 elements in his scheme, and by 1827, 36. These concepts and discoveries allowed the rapid advancement of the field of chemistry [4].

John_Dalton_by_Thomas_Phillips,_1835
John Dalton

Today Dalton is regarded as the father of atomic theory [4]. He died in 1844, having achieved fellowship in the Royal Society, corresponding membership in the French Académie des Sciences, and foreign honorary membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences [6].

My close relatives and I are related to John Dalton through the Bowers and Snyder side of the family. We descend from John Fearon, Sr., of Eaglesfield (d. Jan 1661/2), the grandfather of Abigail Fearon Dalton. John Dalton is our third cousin several times removed [4].

The Bartram genealogical material cited in this article, and our connection to it, is available in the Stayman-McCrosky Ancestry, which can be downloaded at Lulu.com. The Dalton-Fearon material is in The Omnibus Ancestry: 619 Documented American and European Lines, likewise downloadable at Lulu.com.


Notes

[1] Boles, D.B., & Boles, H.W. (2000). Stayman-McCrosky Ancestry. Tuscaloosa, AL: private print. Available for download at Lulu.com.

[2] Information retrieved from http://biography.yourdictionary.com/john-bartram (2017).

[3] Slaughter, T.P. (1996). The Natures of John and William Bartram. NY: Alfred A. Knopf.

[4] Boles, D.B. (2017). The Omnibus Ancestry: 619 Documented American and European Lines.  Available for download at Lulu.com.

[5] Millington, J.P. (1906). John Dalton. London: J.M. Dent & Co.

[6] Information retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dalton (2017).

[7] von Meyer, E. (1891). A History of Chemistry from Earliest Times to the Present Day. London: Macmillan and Co.

[8] Nummedal, T. (2013). Alchemy and religion in Christian Europe. Ambix, vol. 60, pp. 311-322.


Picture Attributions

John Bartram: Public domain. A controversial portrait, it is not universally accepted as one of John; and if it is of John, it may nor may not be from life. Nevertheless it has inscribed on the back, in an apparent 18th-century hand, “Portrait of John Bartram of Darby died 1777 … C.W. Peale Artist. Property of Isaac Bartram 1795.” (Slaughter, op. cit.).

William Bartram portrait: Public domain.

John and William Bartram home and garden: “Jtfry at English Wikipedia”, Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

John Dalton: Public domain.

31. Three Printed Books

Although my blog entries have emphasized downloadable publications, Bolesbooks actually offers three printed books that are otherwise unavailable in electronic form. Yes, that’s right: Real paper and real binding! They’re described below, but for access to indexes, prices, and ordering information, please visit the Bolesbooks web site.

Barth-Hickey Ancestry

(358 pages, softbound). With the additional familes of Bodine, Bowman, Brown, Brownlee, Burnett, Crocheron, Drury, Finch, French, Greiner, Gullett, Heisdorfer, Housh, Langham, Malmberg, Martin, McClain, McMurtrie, Millard, Mills, Phillips, Reynolds, Robinson, Rung, Russell, Shercliffe, Sinnott, Spinke, Swanson, Wilson, and Wolcott. Includes pictures.  Limited copies remaining; will not be reprinted.

The Barth-Hickey Ancestry covers a particularly strong concentration of families from St. Mary’s co, Md, especially Catholic families in the 1600s and 1700s. Other major geographic areas variously inhabited by Protestant or Catholic ancestors were Iowa, Ind, and NJ; Macon co, Ill; Nelson co, Ky; Washington co, Pa; Somerset co, Md; and Augusta co, Va. Other names, areas, and periods are also represented.

Speece-Robinson Ancestry

(222 pages, softbound). Co-author Harold W. Boles. With the additional families of Addams, Altruth, Auliffe, Bailey, Brown, Cole, Conklin, Cunningham, Dick, Dobbs, Doors, Flexney, Gobels, Hinds, McIntire, op den Graeff, Pletges, Princehouse, Rossiter, Tarpley, Tomey, and Williams. And Addenda on the Adams, Bachiler, Dungan, Holbrook, Large, Latham, Swift, Weaver, and Wing Families. Includes pictures.  Very limited copies remaining; will not be reprinted.

The Speece-Robinson Ancestry covers a number of families from Champaign and Shelby counties, Ohio; Frederick co, Va; Berkeley and Morgan counties, WVa; Bucks and Philadelphia counties, Pa; what is now Union co, NJ; New England; and England, Ireland, and Germany. The American coverage is particularly strong in the 1700s and 1800s, but there is a substantial segment of material from the 1600s as well. Other names, areas, and periods are also represented.

Withers-Davis Ancestry

(427 pages, hardbound). Co-author Harold W. Boles. With the additional families of Abraham, Babb, Bachiler, Chandler, Collet, David, Davies, Hollingsworth, Hussey, Jefferis, Lewis, Martin, May, Nash, Nowell, Perkins, Powell, Ree, Roberts, Sloper, Tarrant, Wise, Wood, and Woolaston. Also numerous Welsh families ancestral to William, David, and Ralph Lewis, and John Bevan, plus their royal descents.  Will not be reprinted.

The Withers-Davis Ancestry covers a large concentration of families from the area of Chester and Delaware counties, Pennsylvania; New Castle co, Delaware; New England; co. Wilts, England; and co. Glamorgan and surrounding areas of Wales. Many though by no means all of the families were Quaker. Coverage in America is particularly heavy in the 1600s and 1700s, making the book indispensable to those seeking their colonial roots. Other names, areas, and periods are also represented.

books.cover

 

21. The Power of Convergence, Part 2: O Brother, Where Art Thou?

In a previous blog entry, 17. The Power of Convergence, Part 1: Francis Drake, I described the use of the web to find a reference imperfectly cited to me about 45 years previously. Entering three names said to appear in the record, I quickly located the reference using Google Search, and found that it was available in free, downloadable form. That in turn allowed me to dispell the myth that my ancestor Francis Drake, of New Hampshire and New Jersey, was originally of West Meath, Ireland.

Thus the convergent power of the web, something unimagined 45 years ago, provided information that significantly impacted on a genealogical conclusion. Each of the three names entered alone produced thousands of hits — to be specific, about 695,000 for Francis Drake, 63,400 for Thomas Temple, and 231,000 for Richard Saunders — but when entered simultaneously, convergence was found on one unique source that matched information I had been given decades earlier. Using it, I was able to draw a negative conclusion about the origin of my ancestor .

But what about more positive instances? Can convergence be used to support, not just dispel relationships? In my experience the answer is yes — especially if you start with a known “starter” relationship.

“Starter” Relationships

A “starter” relationship is between two people, known to be of the same family, each connected to a number of possibly associated records. Looking for overlap among the possible associations is what allows for convergence. For example if a possible origin (among several) of one person matches a possible origin (among several) of a related person, there is a fair chance that the match indicates their common origin.

Brotherly love

In my experience the starter relationship is usually between brothers. This is probably due to the fact that brothers usually have the same surname, while married sisters, or a married sister and a brother, typically do not. Therefore brothers tend to be known to a greater extent than other sibling pairs.

To illustrate the power of convergence in such situations, I briefly present two case studies involving brothers.

The Slack Brothers

In tracing my Slack ancestors, attention quickly settled on two contemporaries who settled in Mason county, Kentucky, about the same time prior to 1800. One, John Slack, seemed most likely to be our ancestor, but for a time we could not rule out the other, Jacob Slack. I wrote about this problem in my very first blog entry (1. John Slack of Mason County, Kentucky: Poverty and a Glittering Past), and there is no point in rehashing it here. For present purposes it is enough to state that we believed the two men to be brothers. How could this fact be used to determine their origin?

Census records in this case proved to provide the initial point of convergence. By examining the 1790 census nationwide, using the web resource Ancestry.com, it was found that a John Slack and a Jacob Slack both appeared as heads of household in the 1790 census of Harford county, Maryland. With research attention turned to Maryland, I quickly located an 1816 deed by which Jacob Slack of Mason county, Kentucky, sold a share of land in Harford county. There could be no doubt: The intermediate place of origin of the two brothers was Harford county.

But where were they from before that? Web searches turned up the next point of convergence. John and Jacob Sleght, sons of Hendrick Sleght, were baptized respectively in May 1746 and July 1757 in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, dates initially found on the web but later confirmed in printed church records. A number of other circumstances matched as well — among them, evidence from Kentucky and Maryland that John was significantly older than Jacob, and a gravestone in Kentucky giving an age for Jacob that was closely consistent with the baptismal record.

This discovery made it possible not just to identify the father of the brothers, but to add multiple ancestral lines tracing back in some cases many generations. It was a major windfall discovery.

While there were a number of facts possibly associated with John, and a number possibly associated with Jacob, it was the convergence of information across both that allowed the discovery of their origin. To fully appreciate the importance of that, consider what would have happened had I known only of John Slack. I would have found multiple possible places of origin in census and tax records, and would have been at a loss when attempting to identify which pertained. It was the known “starter” relationship of John to Jacob that solved the problem.

The Altrate (Altred) Brothers

My ancestor Christopher Altrate (Altred; Alteriedt) arrived at Philadelphia in 1749, and was in Frederick county, Virginia, by 1760. He resided in Winchester, and there became one of the founders of the town’s Evangelical Lutheran church. In his will, made in 1765, he referred to property that would come to him in Youghstousen, Germany. Christopher had an apparent brother named Michael Altred, who had been fined in 1761 in Frederick county for being absent from a muster, and who stood security for Christopher’s widow when she administered his estate.

The name of the German location proved problematic, because there is no Youghtstousen in Germany. A query directed to a genealogy forum elicited the same response from two native German speakers: In their opinion the location was probably Jagsthausen, in Württemberg.

Convergence in this case came from the ongoing indexing of German birth and christening records by the LDS Church. A record for Christoph Alteried showed a birth date of 16 Apr 1724, as recorded in the Evangelisch church, Ruchsen, Baden. That of his brother Georg Michael Alteriedt occurred on 5 Oct 1725, recorded in the same church. Both were sons of Johann Friederich Alteried by his wife Maria Agnes. Then came the best part, the discovery that Jagsthausen is only 6.5 road miles from Ruchsen [1]. The deal was sealed.

Again, the case illustrates the use of web-based information to provide convergence between brothers in a known starter relationship, this time using the online FamilySearch facility of the LDS Church (familysearch.org). Discovering the parents made it possible to trace a number of further generations in multiple family lines.

Other Brothers

A number of other examples could be described. They include the Barber family of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and co. York, England; the Bowers (Bauer) family of Berks county, Pennsylvania, Frederick co, Virginia, and Baden, Germany; and the Mosby family of Charles City county, Virginia, and co. Norfolk, England.   For full descriptions and references, and the ancestries of these families as well as those of the Slack and Altrate families, see The Omnibus Ancestry, available for download at Lulu.com.

In all of these cases, it was knowledge that two men were brothers that allowed the convergent power of the web to identify their common origin.

Caveat

Keep in mind that merely finding the names of two brothers in earlier records at the same location is often insufficient to establish that the records concern those brothers. To take an extreme example, starting with the names of two brothers named John and James Smith would likely turn up hundreds of possible convergences, only one of which may be the proverbial needle in the haystack.

It’s only in the instance of rare names (first and/or last) that names alone might lead one to assume identity. The Altrates/Altreds are possibly a case in point, as the surname is rare, especially when appearing with the given names Christopher and Michael.

Nevertheless in all the cases cited, additional information was available that supported identity. The Altrates/Altreds were thought to have a property interest in Jagsthausen, only a few miles from the convergent location of Ruchsen. The Slack brothers, while having a moderately uncommon surname, were chiefly identified as the sons of Hendrick through their age spread and a close correspondence in birth and christening dates, along with other considerations that were described in the original blog entry.

Thus when applying a starter relationship to look for convergence on a common location, all known facts should be exploited to either confirm or disconfirm the convergence. In this regard the enterprise is similar to other applications of the genealogist’s craft.


Note:

[1] The sharp-eyed reader will have noticed that Ruchsen is in Baden while Jagsthausen is in Württemberg. Until 1846 Ruchsen was an exclave of Baden, being completely surrounded by Württemberg. In that year territories were exchanged that gave it land access to the rest of Baden. However, a border remained between Ruchsen and Jagsthausen (information retrieved from https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruchsen, 2016).


Picture attribution: Owner Jen’s Art & Soul, Brotherly Love, retrieved from https://www.flickr.com/photos/frazzledjen/177002473. Used under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

 

12. Frances Latham, The Mother of Governors: Her Marriages and Ancestry

Except for limited notes at the end, all references and additional information on the persons in this entry are given in two volumes. The first is The Omnibus Ancestry. It updates and corrects, in brief form, a number of works including the more detailed volume, Foster Ancestors: Some Europeans, Immigrants, Colonists, and Pioneers. Both volumes are available for download through Lulu.com. They are referenced below as OA and FA, respectively.


This Mother’s Day it seems appropriate to recognize one of the most celebrated of my immigrant ancestors, Frances Latham (1609/10-1677). Born to a family in royal service, she successively married a perfumer, a nephew of an Earl, and a Baptist minister [OA,FA]. By this unlikely assortment of husbands she had twelve children, destined to be ancestors through direct descent or marriage of attorneys-general, speakers of the House, Revolutionary officers, a British rear admiral, an American ambassador to Russia; and Julia Ward Howe, writer of The Battle Hymn of the Republic [1].

But above all, Frances was The Mother of Governors. This name was bestowed on her by Louise Tracy, a genealogist who in 1908 listed as Frances’ descendants, directly or by marriage, 13 colonial or state governors and 9 deputy or lieutenant governors [1]. Recently this list has been expanded by an additional two governors. Even if the count is restricted to direct descendants, and redundancies are eliminated (e.g., by not double-counting lieutenant governors who became governors), Frances was the ancestor of an impressive 10 governors and 3 deputy or lieutenant governors [2].

Frances’ BirthLewis Latham

Frances was baptized on 15 February 1609/10 in Bedfordshire, England, the daughter of Lewis Latham and his first wife Elizabeth [6, OA, FA]. Lewis was of Elstow, two miles south of the town of Bedford. He was an “under falconer” in 1625 and a Sergeant of the Hawks in 1627, receiving £65 a year. His patron was King Charles I, a relationship that began prior to Charles’ coronation when he was the Prince of Wales. With Charles’ execution Lewis’ income fell dramatically, to the extent that when he made his will in 1653, his bequests were in pence rather than pounds. He died in 1655. In 1662, following the Restoration, his widow Winifred applied to King Charles II for arrears of his salary, and was granted £40 a year [OA, FA].

Frances’ Marriages

Frances, born into this background of royal service, was married in 1629 to William Dungan, a perfumer by trade. They lived in Waterside, an area of London situated between the Strand and the River Thames. William had been baptized only the year before as an adult, in the local parish church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields. Originally indentured to an innkeeper, he became involved in distilling oils for perfumes, which he sold from a shop at his home. The marriage was not of long duration, for William died in 1636. He left a widow only 26 years old and four young children; another is believed to have predeceased him [OA, FA].

Frances next married, in 1637 in England, Jeremiah (Jeremy) Clarke. Through his mother Mary Weston he was a nephew of Richard Weston (1576/7-1634/5), 1st Earl of Portland [3,4]. His father William Clarke was of the London merchant class, a son of grocer James Clarke. Jeremiah’s brothers Weston and James, both of London, were respectively a merchant and a grocer [3]. It therefore seems likely that Frances, widow of London perfumer William Dungan, met her second husband through mutual acquaintances among the merchants of London.

Frances soon immigrated to America with Jeremiah, who in 1638 was admitted an inhabitant of Aquidneck island, part of the colony of Rhode Island. Their seven children were all born in the colony and survived to adulthood. Jeremiah died in January 1651/2 [FA].

Frances last married, by January 1656/7, a Baptist minister named William Vaughan. It is believed the couple were childless. After Frances died in 1677, her gravestone gave her name as “Frances Vaughan”, yet described her as “ye mother of ye only children of Capt’n Jeremiah Clarke” [FA].

Frances’ Ancestry

The parentage of Lewis Latham, Frances’ falconer father, has long been a matter of supposition. In 1632, the will of a William Latham named as brothers both Lewis and Simon Latham. Simon was a famous falconer in his own right, who authored books on the subject including Latham’s Falconry [OA].

Alfred Justice, author of an influential Clarke and Dungan genealogy, believed that the brothers were the children of John Latham, Jr., of Brigstock, Northamptonshire [5]. While he was correct as to location, it is now known that Lewis and his brothers were actually the children of John’s uncle Oliver Latham (ca 1516-ca 1572), gentleman keeper of the Little Park of Brigstock [OA].

Oliver, in turn, was named as a son in the will of Thomas Latham (ca 1488?-1558), of Culworth and Kingsthorpe, co. Northampton. He was keeper of the Game Park in Moulton and Kingsthorpe. A violent man in defense of his territory, it was testified at a hearing in 1542 that he had killed a mastiff and a dog, and had forbidden the inhabitants of Boughton to use long bows in their fields. Further, he was said to have beaten and wounded shepherds and herdsmen in the fields at Kingsthorpe. It was even alleged that his servant had killed a man, and that Thomas himself had beaten to death another [OA,FA].

Thomas’ parentage is unclear but was almost certainly not that advocated by Justice, who suggested that he was the son of Nicholas Latham. Nicholas, whose now-missing will was dated at Lathom, Lancashire, in 1461, was of a completely different, distant county. It is more likely that Thomas was the son of James Latham, underkeeper of the fields of Kingsthorpe, co. Northampton, ca 1485-ca 1497. He was also, like Thomas, at some time keeper of the Game Park at Moulton [OA].

A fascinating deposition given by one Simon Mallory indicates that James was a man of very different character than his turbulent successor. Mallory admitted “That the said James Latham did oftentymes take the deponent in stellyng and kyllyng of conyes [rabbits] in Pysford feld w’ hys bowe, and dyd oftyn take away the bowe of this deponent, but upon the gentle entretye of this deponent the said James Latham did always restore to this deponent his bowe agayn” [OA].

Clearly the locals perceived a big difference between the stewardship of this keeper and possible ancestor, and that of Thomas Latham, who was otherwise the earliest known Latham ancestor of The Mother of Governors [OA].

Notes:

[1] Tracy, L. (1908). An Historic Strain of Blood in America: Frances Latham — Mother of Governors. New Haven, Conn: Reprinted from The Journal of American History.

[2] Information retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frances_Latham (2015).

[3] The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, v. 74, pp. 68-76, 130-140 (1920).

[4] Weis, F.L. (1992). Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co.

[5] Justice, A.R. (1922). Ancestry of Jeremy Clarke of Rhode Island and Dungan Genealogy. Philadelphia: Franklin Printing Co.

[6] “Split dates” like that cited — 15 February 1609/10 — may seem imprecise to those unfamiliar with them, but the contrary is true. Before 1752 in England, the Julian calendar was followed in which the new year began not on 1 January, but on 25 March. Thus a split date is one in January, February, or most of March (in this case February), with the year first given as shown in contemporary records (1609) and second as understood in today’s calendar (1610). Genealogical novices frequently “simplify” by leaving the date as one or the other (15 February 1609 or 15 February 1610). This is a mistake because it fails to differentiate between two distinct days, a year apart.


Picture attributions:

Lewis Latham — Public domain.

Featured image of hawks on Facebook, etc. — Thomas O’Neil – http://www.thomasoneil.com/photo.php?f=416, used under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Generic license.

3. The Jolliffe Family Descent from Barbara Blaugdone, Quaker Sufferer

A genealogist constantly judges the relative worth of varying lines of evidence, sorting and sifting in an attempt to arrive at the truth. One excellent example of this is provided by the descent of the Jolliffe family of Frederick county, Virginia, from Barbara Blaugdone, Quaker sufferer and entrant in a number of books on women’s history.

Jolliffe, J. gravestoneI descend from John Jolliffe through my grandmother Audra Foster Boles.  John was born in Frederick county in 1768, and died in Johnson county, Indiana, in 1851 (though his gravestone, possibly placed at some delay after his death, says 1850).  John was the son of James Jolliffe (ca 1734?-1771).   The Quaker connection can be traced backward in time beginning with that generation. In 1759 James was disowned by Friends, as the Quakers were known, probably for marrying “out of unity” — in other words, to a non-Quaker (in this case Hannah Springer).

What is less certain is whether James’ father William Jolliffe, Sr., was also a Friend. William was placed on the roll of attorneys in Frederick county in 1743, and was subsequently known as the “Quakers’ lawyer”, having the law business of the local Hopewell Monthly Meeting. However, while a number of his family members were clearly in membership, William does not appear in that capacity in the meeting’s records. He is nevertheless said to have been buried in the meeting’s cemetery.

According to the much-cited Historical, Genealogical, and Biographical Account of the Jolliffe Family of Virginia, published by W. Jolliffe in 1893, William Jolliffe, Sr., was the son of Joseph Jolliffe and wife Ruth, of Norfolk county, Virginia. This assertion, however, rested on only the slimmest of evidence, specifically a then-existent family legend that Joseph and Ruth had a son James who had a brother William — who in turn had left the area and had never been heard from again. As the author noted, he was otherwise unable to find any record of William in Norfolk county. Nor does there appear to be a record of James there.

The assertion is troubling for two other reasons as well. First, Norfolk and Frederick counties are about 220 road miles apart, a long distance to bridge with an assumption that the same surname in both places indicates relationship. Second, the names of Joseph and Ruth do not appear among the known children of William (William, John, Edmund, and James), or the children of his son James (William, Ann, Drew, Elizabeth, John, and Margaret), an unusual circumstance at a place and time when namesakes were considered important.

A competing account of William Jolliffe’s origins was provided in more modern times by the discovery, published by Cecil O’Dell in 1995, that a William Jolliffe sold land in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1736. This was only a year before William of Frederick county is first known to have appeared in Virginia, as he witnessed a deed in Orange county, one of two parent counties of Frederick county, in 1737.

Could these have been the same men? Further information published by O’Dell showed that one Cuthbert Hayhurst was an adjacent land owner when William Jolliffe sold the Bucks county land. And in what must surely have been a “Eureka!” moment, O’Dell found that Cuthbert Hayhurst witnessed a mortgage of William Jolliffe in Frederick county in 1767.

Which line of evidence should be believed? The 1893 account, recycled through countless publications and web pages, including a 1994 book by my father and myself? In other words, the account with a large geographical discrepancy, no record of William or his putative brother in Norfolk county, and no repetition of parental names? Or the account in which an adjacent landowner in Pennsylvania became William Jolliffe’s witness in Virginia? Clearly the latter, as otherwise the coincidence is astonomically improbable.

The Jolliffe Descent from Barbara Blaugdone

O’Dell also learned that William Jolliffe had a wife named Mary Sheppard, of New York City, who in 1726 had bought the land sold in 1736. His account stopped there, but in short order I was able to work out a descent from Barbara Blaugdone. Mary was the daughter of John Sheppard, a cooper in New York City, and his wife Mary Watts. That Mary, born 1677, was of Bristol Friends’ Monthly Meeting in Bristol, England, and was the daughter of John Watts by his wife Mary Blaugdone, daughter of Barbara Blaugdone. John, the name of Mary Sheppard Jolliffe’s father, was a name found among her children, and among those of her son James. While the name Mary is not known to appear among the children, the names of the daughters of William and Mary are unknown.

Barbara Blaugdone, Quaker Sufferer

Barbara Blaugdone, born Barbara Brock in 1609 but widow of a Blaugdone husband whose given name is not known, died in 1704 in London, England. Toward the end of her life, in 1691, she published a remarkable autobiographical sketch, An Account of the Travels, Sufferings, and Persecutions of Barbara Blaugdone. In her highly readable account, she noted that she was a teacher in Bristol, England, when she converted to Quakerism in 1654. After losing most of her students because of her “dangerous” beliefs, she became a preacher. She obtained the release of Quaker prisoners at Basingstoke in 1655, and over the following two years undertook missionary trips to Ireland, meeting at one point with Henry Cromwell, then major general of forces but later Lord Deputy of Ireland.

Preaching in western England in 1657, she was imprisoned at Marlborough and went on a short hunger strike. She did the same in Exeter and was whipped in prison. During these early years she was at least twice in mortal danger, once when stabbed and once when a bystander narrowly prevented a butcher from striking her head with his cleaver. She also suffered shipwreck and piracy. While imprisoned in Dublin a man confessed to her that he had borne false witness against 5 men and women. However, the judge would not hear her and hanged them all, causing her to recall, “And a heavy day it was, and I bore and suffered much that day”. In 1681 she was again imprisoned, in Bristol, and in 1683 was fined the large sum of £60 for failure to attend the Anglican church.

Barbara’s life and writing have been included in a number of books on women’s history. They include A Historical Dictionary of British Women (2005); Female Alliances: Gender, Identity, and Friendship in Early Modern Britain (2014); Life Writings (2001), a volume of the series Early Modern Englishwoman; and Reading Early Modern Women: An Anthology of Texts in Manuscript and Print, 1550-1700 (2003). Her monograph is also frequently cited in Quaker histories.

What Was Barbara Blaugdone’s Background?

As forthcoming as Barbara was about her sufferings, she was remarkably circumspect when it came to her own family background. Yet sprinkled throughout her writing are references that suggest she may have been of the upper class, and that she consorted with nobility prior to becoming a Quaker. Thus, writing of a trip to Devonshire in 1654/5, she stated, “I went to the Earl of Bath’s, where I had formerly spent much time in vanity”, and that when she asked to speak to the countess, she “never asked me to go into her house, although I had eaten and drank at her table, and lodged there many a time”. Then of her imprisonment in Dublin, Ireland, which occurred about 1656, she wrote “there were some friends of mine, namely — Sir William King, Colonel Fare [sic, Fane?; see below], and the Lady Browne … came to see me, and they would needs go to this judge, to get me released . . . [they] told him they had known me from a child, and there was no harm in me at all”.

These references highlight a second aspect of genealogy, i.e., that it is never complete. The classical example is that every generation traced provides two parents to be further traced. In this case real persons were named in Barbara’s account to whom, potentially, she may have been related. The “Earl of Bath’s” must have been the Devonshire estate of the recently deceased Henry Bourchier, 5th (or 6th) Earl of Bath, whose widow was Rachel Fane, daughter of the Earl of Westmorland. Rachel had a brother Col. George Fane, whose son Sir Henry Fane was confirmed an estate near Limerick, Ireland, in 1668. Also near Limerick were the substantial lands of Sir William King and his wife Barbara Boyle, widow of Sir John Brown.

Barbara herself hinted that she may have been from Ireland, for she noted of her visit to Cork that “I was made to call to my relations and acquaintance … I came to witness that a prophet is not without honour, save in his own country”. It is possible that somewhere among the repeating names of Fane, King, and Brown, in Ireland, lies the origin of Barbara Blaugdone. Perhaps it merely awaits an enterprising genealogist to discover.


All references for the above statements are given in two volumes. The first is the all-in-one ancestry, The Omnibus Ancestry. That work updates and corrects, in brief form, material in the much more detailed volume, Ellis Ancestors: Some Immigrants, Colonists, and Pioneers (1994). Both books are available for download through Lulu.

You may also be interested in visiting the Bolesbooks website or the Bolesbooks Facebook page.